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20121001
20121009
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
solid government institutions and a judicial branch that treats all venezuelans equally under the law. he was elected to run against chavez after the venezuelan opposition forged an alliance in january. the 40-year-old candidate says he has visited more than 300 venezuelan towns during his campaign. he stepped on to the national scene during a 2002 riot at the cuban embassy in caracas. the chavez government accused him of insighting the riot and sentenced him to jail for four mis. the courts ended up acquitting him. >> you got this young 40-year-old, you know, he's healthy and strong, fit guy and hugo chavez who has been in power for a while. how do they weigh these two? is it a generational thing? how do they split this? >> it's a generational thing. chavez has been suffering from cancer. also just to give you and idea how uneven the playing field is in venezuela, just for the sake of a hypothetical scenario, imagine president obama has a national tv network paid for with public funds that he can use whenever he pleases to campaign. that's exactly what chavez has in venezuela. he has
campaign finance should be regulated, the current state of affairs is that the law is unclear and no one knows if the decisions will stand or get knocked down. it is insane, the wild west. it bodes poorly for us to understand what powers are at work. it is worth mentioning the stock act recently passed which will have new information for us to sink our teeth into a realm financial disclosures. financial transactions have to be disclosed monthly. there are certain things in their we worry about. that is a whole nother set of information. the third thing i want to mention is how political power functions. , the structure of the political dialogue. right now it is a mess. this is not the rules committee fault. in ways it is obama's fault. this is something to think about as you think about how the house works and what kind of tools we should build on the outside. when i look at the different categories of congressional information, it to the things we worked hard on, one is taking advantage of political pressures that exist. nonprofits would love to be able to create political pressure. we
has just enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years
patients, to advocate for patients, and through tough law enforcement to protect patients. the partnership for safe medicines has been a steadfast and consistent voice towards these goals. in doing so, you felt the american people be safe from products that are sold as legitimate medicines that heal, but are far more likely to be dangerous. for batch of my deep appreciation and commitment, we must continue to work together. we must build on the successes that we've already achieved together, and we must continue to put the safety and health of the public as our first and foremost priority. so thank you for your time and for all the good work that all of you do, from the various positions you hold, and your commitment to this critical public health concern. thank you so much. [applause] >> this is the first book i've written where there's an actual same storyline running through it. it's a true story of about basically 10 days of london in 1854. it's a story of an incredibly terrifying outbreak that took place during this period, an outbreak of cholera. the first half of the book is really
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
. in this everybody so there were people in a hotel conference rooms. there were people in law from conference rooms where they could get an internet connection. people working at starbucks where they could get an internet connection, people working at their kitchen tables around town. all of a sudden, around april 1 we start moving into our headquarters finally. this is six weeks away from the announcement or maybe even longer. just this big space, far bigger than this room, about three times the size of this room on the whole floor of a high-rise building in chicago. it was remarkable. we did not have everybody in yet, but we were still getting our servers up. we had phones ringing and people try to answer phones. we had e-mail coming into our e- mail address and did not even have a system to receive e-mail in a real way that. you that. we had mail coming in but we did not have a budget yet. we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate. we had fund-raisers. we had to raise money with this little-known barack obama brand against wh
of on the lays side. i bring my bull whip a little bit. come on, let's go. it might be against the law but i do that too. >> a bull whip and a church fan is not unheard of. that's terrific. i know you're supporting the president. what are your thoughts on the debate this week? >> i like to find out which one of the republicans paid "saturday night live" not to come on live last night. they had a replay. i was hoping to see something more action. "saturday night live" usually brings things into perspective with a little bit better humor. >> you don't like to see a rerun of mick jagger hosting? >> no, not really. >> i would have loved to watch that. >> i want to see romney get up there, man and stop all his lying he's doing. he just lies like a rug. the man just, every other word is a lie. >> give me an example because i don't think he's on the same level of dishonesty as paul ryan. >> barack obama is robbing the. >> social security. >> medication. >> that's a lie. >> what are they planning to do social security to rob people, privatize it. they need to say hey we need to pay that money back to t
suppression laws are going on. we're out here fighting for him. >> bill: voter suppression. never mentioned that. >> caller: i.d. laws. we're fighting on the ground for him and he comes not ready to play. he should have said a b c d. where was the boxing going on? >> bill: you know, he knows his stuff. you know he knows this stuff. you know he was frustrated last night. i don't know why he didn't -- maybe he felt he couldn't engage but you know, i thought he had to. we wanted him to. >> caller: he was campaigning too much. maybe he needed three days to lay down and relax. maybe he's been doing too much. >> bill: i don't know. but they spent two days in henderson, nevada with john kerry preparing for this debate. i guess -- as i said before the break, maybe hiring john kerry as his debate coach was the first mistake. lee in los angeles. what do you say? >> caller: hi, bill press. i've been with you here in california. >> bill: we had some good days out there lee. >> caller: we did. you know what, bill? i did
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)